Visual Studio 2015 CodeLens Announcements!

In the last couple of weeks we have seen a plethora of awesome announcements and updates regarding Visual Studio 2015! The biggest one has to do with the new product versions. The “merging” of Premium and Ultimate into the new Enterprise level brings a ton of great features, including CodeLens, to a larger group of developers!

Visual Studio 2015 Product Offerings

Source: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudio/archive/2015/03/31/announcing-the-visual-studio-2015-product-line.aspx

That alone was a major announcement, but wait, there’s more. Due to the overwhelming response on User Voice for Visual Studio to make CodeLens available for Visual Studio Professional users, they have done that as well!

User Voice: Visual Studio – CodeLens

Source: http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/4150271-make-codelens-available-outside-of-ultimate

This is absolutely amazing and I could not be more excited for all developers. I have been giving a presentation about Visual Studio for ALM and development and this was the number 1 question I have ever been asked. Check out the update below.

Visual Studio 2015 IDE Code Lens

Source: https://www.visualstudio.com/products/compare-visual-studio-2015-products-vs

I encourage everyone to keep checking out the Visual Studio 2015 updates as well as vote for your favorite suggestions on User Voice for Visual Studio.

— Tim Ferro

Visual Studio 2013 Screencast from FEDSPUG

FEDSPUG April 2014: Visual Studio 2013 for Application Lifecycle Management and SharePoint with Tim Ferro from Women in SharePoint DC on Vimeo.

Visual Studio 2013 is a monumental leap forward for Microsoft development. There are so many useful enhancements and features that each could be their own session. This session will give an overview of the new features then focus on those related to Application Lifecycle Management, .Net Framework, Mobile, Team Foundation Server 2013, and SharePoint. From project planning, to mobile testing, to inline enhancements from CodeLens, this session will show developers and team leads why Visual Studio 2013 is worth upgrading to immediately!

PowerPoint Slides

SharePoint Saturday DC Chevy Chase 2014

Click image for PowerPoint

Click image for PowerPoint

Visual Studio 2013 is a monumental leap forward for Microsoft development. There are so many useful enhancements and features that each could be their own session. This session will give an overview of the new features then focus on those related to Application Lifecycle Management, Mobile, Team Foundation Server 2013, and SharePoint. From project planning, to mobile testing, to inline enhancements from CodeLens, this session will show developers and team leads why Visual Studio 2013 is worth upgrading to immediately!

Visual Studio 2013, TFS 2013, and CodeLens

Source: http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Visual-Studio-Toolbox/Visual-Studio-2013-Preview

I cannot remember the last time I saw enhancements to Visual Studio that made me think “Wow that’s amazing”, but this video from Microsoft’s Channel 9 showing off the enhancements to Visual Studio 2013 and Team Foundation Server (TFS) 2013 made me think that! I embedded the video but honestly you should click the above link, go to the site, read the blurb, and watch the video. There are so many great enhancements that I wouldn’t be able to do them justice trying to explain them all. This video is a MUST WATCH for all Microsoft developers.

Of all the improvements, my favorite is the new CodeLens feature.

“Understanding what a line of code does is only part of your challenge as a developer. You must also understand its history, who worked on it, what code references it, and more. This becomes especially challenging in team-oriented projects. CodeLens (Code Information Indicators) in Visual Studio 2013 Preview uses information from both your project metadata and Team Foundation Server 2013 preview to place decorators on each of the methods in your code that show information such as what changesets led to the creation or recent change, who was the last person to work on the code, what unit tests cover the method (including the latest pass/fail state), and what code references exist. You can also quickly jump into that data, such as an associated changeset or referenced code file with just a click.”

Source: http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/eng#2013-preview+story-2013preview

To watch just the CodeLens part of the video, use this link: http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Visual-Studio-Toolbox/Visual-Studio-2013-Preview#time=17m00s

Tim Ferro